Home » One Asian Eye: Growing Up Eurasian in America by Jean Giovanetti
One Asian Eye: Growing Up Eurasian in America Jean Giovanetti

One Asian Eye: Growing Up Eurasian in America

Jean Giovanetti

Published November 16th 2004
ISBN : 9780595335879
Paperback
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 About the Book 

The great thing about being ostracized is theres no peer pressure. Jean is the ultimate outsider. With a white father and Asian mother, she is too dark to be considered white and too white to be considered anything else. She catches grief fromMoreThe great thing about being ostracized is theres no peer pressure. Jean is the ultimate outsider. With a white father and Asian mother, she is too dark to be considered white and too white to be considered anything else. She catches grief from whites and minorities alike as she tries to piece together clues from her ancestry among a predominantly white populace.This personal anthology is composed of a series of telling moments. Headed by popular songs, each carefully crafted short story and essay provides humor, drama and powerful insight into the changing face of America.One Asian Eye fills two important gaps in Asian American literature: accounts of the condition of being multiracial and literature in any genre about growing up in the Midwest. The book should fill the needs of many courses in Asian American literature and biography.--John StreamasPostdoctoral Fellow, Asian American Studies, University of IllinoisAssistant Professor, Comparative Ethnic Studies, Washington State UniversityJean Giovanetti captures the often elusive feelings of conflict and confusion that are part of being Asian American in middle America, and she captures them with beautiful, evocative and righteous prose. Thanks to her, our voice--and our shared experience--are made louder and richer and more powerful.--Gil AsakawaDenverPost.com Executive ProducerNikkeiview.com online columnist and author of Being Japanese American (Stone Bridge Press, 2004)Jeans writing is a rare find, and definitely shows that Asian Americans can flourish in the Great Void between the East and West Coasts.--Wataru Ebihara, PhDPoet and a native of Cleveland now living in Los Angeles